High court ruling challenges UK government on Brexit

On the 3rd of November, the UK’s High Court has ruled that Parliament must vote on whether the UK can start the process of leaving the EU. The UK High court has deemed unconstitutional the government's wish to trigger art. 50 of the Lisbon Treaty without an official vote by Parliament.

Author: Gabriela Dimitrova/Friday, November 4, 2016/Categories: Article

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On the 3rd of November, the UK’s High Court has ruled that Parliament must vote on whether the UK can start the process of leaving the EU. The UK High court has deemed unconstitutional the government's wish to trigger art. 50 of the Lisbon Treaty without an official vote by Parliament.

The government has already launched an appeal against the decision, with another hearing set to take place at the Supreme Court on the 7th of December. However, in a public statement the judges stated that “The court does not accept the argument put forward by the government”. It has been argued by many from the "remain" camp as well as "Brexiters" that the normal procedure should be followed and therefore MPs must vote officially trigger art 50.

The Higher Court's decision has brought more confusion to an already difficult situation. It has now cause much debate on whether Theresa May, the UK Prime Minister will be able to stick to her timetable to trigger Article 50 by the end of March – and leave the EU by spring 2019. She stated that she would be calling Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the EU Commission to ensure that the setback will not derail her plan to begin negotiations by the end of March 2017.

If the High Court ruling is respected, MPs will be faced with what will most probably be the most difficult decision of their political career. Follow the people's wishes despite the small margin win from Brexiters or vote for what they personally believe to be in the best interest for the UK.

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